Posts Tagged ‘colorado river kayaking’

A Beginner’s Guide to Kayaking Like a Pro

Learning to kayak in Las Vegas has numerous benefits. From meeting like-minded people to simply having the option to get on the water anytime you’d like, there are many great reasons to pick up the sport of kayaking. As with any new endeavor, learning to kayak takes time and practice. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll be able to safely and confidently make the most of your Colorado River kayaking excursions.

Types of Kayaks

Kayaks come in many forms. They are designed for use in various conditions that range from tranquil waters such as ponds and small lakes to whitewater rapids and the ocean. Some types of kayaks are easier to use than others, which makes them a better option for beginners.

  • Sit-on-top
  • Touring
  • Inflatable
  • Tandem

Sit-on-top kayaks are one of the best varieties for beginners. They are wide and have a good center of balance, which makes them sturdy and easy to maneuver out on the water. Sit-on-top kayaks are typically less expensive than other kinds of kayaks. While sit-on-top kayaks are wide and stable, they are also larger and slower than other kayak styles, which makes them a better fit for calmer waters.

Touring kayaks are generally longer and narrower than sit-on-top kayaks. They are also lighter-weight, which makes them more transportable and a bit faster. Touring kayaks are a preferred choice for more seasoned kayakers or beginners who have a good sense of balance. Because they are narrower, touring kayaks are a bit more challenging to get into and out of than sit-on-top kayaks, especially when you’re out on the water.

Inflatable kayaks are suitable for kayakers of all skill levels. They are most useful for people who plan to hike to their kayak launch point, as they can be easily rolled up and tucked away. Inflatable kayaks are best suited for calmer waters, which makes them a good option for novice kayakers.

Tandem kayaks are kayaks made for two people rather than one. Tandem kayaks are available in several styles, including sit-on-top and touring. Tandem kayaks also come in inflatable form.

As you’re deciding what kind of kayak to get, there are several key considerations to think about. First, will you be kayaking by yourself or with another person most of the time? You will also want to think about where you will be transporting your kayak to for launches, and how comfortable you feel loading and unloading the boat by yourself. Then, you’ll want to think about how easy it is for you to get into and out of the boat on your own, both on land and in water. Many kayak retailers will let you test out different boats first to figure out which one you want to get.

Gear and Accessories

To make your kayaking experience as fun and positive as possible, you’ll want to make sure that you have the right gear and accessories along for the ride. Weather can change quickly when you are on the Colorado River kayaking, depending on the time of day and the season. Daytime temperatures can be much warmer than in the evening or early in the morning, which means you’ll want to dress in layers or bring a change of clothes if you’ll be out on the water for longer periods of time. The sun can also be strong, which makes sunscreen or sun protection essential. If you are bringing your phone, camera, wallet, or other valuables along for the ride, you’ll want to keep them dry and protected with a waterproof bag or pouch. If your eyes are sensitive to the sun, wearing polarized sunglasses with ultraviolet (UV) protection is strongly encouraged. No matter what you wear, your clothing and footwear should be water-resistant or waterproof.

Personal Flotation Devices

For safety reasons, wearing a personal flotation device (PFD) when out on the water is highly recommended. Like kayaks, PFDs are made in various styles to suit the different kinds of water that you’ll be kayaking in.

Type I PFDs are heavy-duty flotation devices made for use in rougher water and the ocean. Type II or Type III PFDs are a bit more comfortable. They are not quite as cumbersome as Type I PFDs, which makes them a better choice for calmer waters where you’ll likely be rescued more quickly. While Type I, II, and III PFDs are made specifically for kayaking, you can also get PFDs made for multiple activities, such as Type V. If you get a Type V PFD, be sure to check that it is suitable for kayaking before making your purchase.

Finding a Suitable Time and Location

Once you’ve found the right boat and accessories, it’s time to get in the water. To kayak safely and successfully, you’ll need to research places to kayak based on your skill and comfort level. Remember that you must find a place that’s accessible to the public, too. Calm waters, which you’ll find on ponds and lakes, are recommended for novice kayakers. Beginners are advised to avoid rivers and oceans as they’re starting due to stronger currents and choppier water. If you are driving to your destination and plan to launch your boat, you’ll also need to figure out parking at the launch spot and determine if there is a launch fee.

No matter where you decide to start your kayaking adventure from, keep an eye on the weather. It’s best to choose a day when skies are clear for maximum visibility. Try to kayak on a day when winds are minimal, and make sure to avoid kayaking if there is a risk of thunderstorms or severe weather in the area.

Blazin’ Paddles | Colorado River Kayaking

Once you’re ready to get started, you may be wondering “where can I learn to kayak near me?” Fortunately, Blazin’ Paddles is here to help you learn. Blazin’ Paddles offers tours for kayakers of all skill levels, which is a great way to safely learn to kayak Las Vegas and get a feel for what it’s like to be out on the water.

Hike Highlight of the Week: Fortification Hill

High Highlight of the Week: Fortification Hill- Lake Mead National Recreation Area By: Lindy Doyle

Fortification Hill is that hike that I heard about for years.Being a Boulder City local, it is a well known hike. This was also a hike I was always a little intimated of. I heard that it is tough to get to in a non 4 x 4 car (which I don’t have) and that it was very difficult and pretty much straight up. Finally, I decided to suck it up and finally do it and it was an experience I am sad it took me so long to have!

 

The top of the ‘hill’ itself can be seen from anywhere if you are heading toward Lake Mead. The tall flat black top hill, that from the road looks like a mountain going up to a flat surface. That’s what makes this hike so interesting. Getting to the top involves steep hills and scrambling up cliffs, all with miles of hilly desert as your background. Once you finally get to the top it is like a whole different world. You are now on a flat surface for the rest of the walk, with black volcanic rocks.

This is an ancient mesa that over the millions of years it has spread, causing magma from the Earth to seep out of it. It was not a volcano where the magma spouted out, it was a natural occurrence over many years. As the magma welled up and came out it cooled into basalt, which is the volcanic rock you see at the top flat surface.

Such cool history, fun hike and the views are well worth the scramble up!

 

The view includes:

-Lake Mead

-Las Vegas Strip

-Mike O’Callaghan and Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge

-Desert and hills for miles

If you have some time and ready for a burning leg and booty workout, I highly suggest going out on this hike!

 

Tips:

-Make sure you have enough water and wearing the right shoes! This is a difficult hike so you want to be as hydrated and comfortable as possible.

-The trailhead is deep in the desert with hills, rocks and some off roading. I would not feel comfortable taking my Hyundai, so make sure you feel comfortable with your car getting out there.

-Give yourself some time and patience. We went fairly quickly but I had to take breaks, don’t be a hero, give yourself plenty of time!

Hike Highlight of The Week: White Owl Canyon

Hike Highlight of The Week: White Owl Canyon

By: Lindy Doyle

If you are in the Vegas area and want to do a fun little hike and see some slot canyons, White Owl Canyon is right around the corner. It is a 3.6 mile loop trail located in Lake Mead Recreational Area and is great for outdoor activities in Las Vegas.

With some seriously beautiful scenery and metal tunnels along the way. the slot canyons themselves were formed from flowing water over the years and are about 1/2 mile long. Look out for the ‘white wash’ along the rocks! This canyon got its name for a reason, that ‘white wash’ is of course Barn Owl poop.

Tips:

-This is a National Recreational Area so there is a $25 entrance fee, don’t forget your Annual National Park Pass!

-Download a hiking app with a map to follow. Not the best marked trail, having a location map will ensure you stay on track!

-There is a fork in the trail where you stay left, again the map will come in handy.

-Dogs are allowed on this trail, just remember the steep gravel here at the beginning and end. Make sure your pup is capable of climbing up a steep hill or light enough to carry before you head out.

-Watch your step, when you see the white wash, keep an eye out underneath for the owl pellets!

-And of course bring plenty of water! There are shaded areas but if you are going in the summer don’t forget to hydrate!

Book A Tour

Las Vegas Kayak Tour Package 0

Half Day Tour

Las Vegas Kayak Tour Package 0

Full Day Tour

Las Vegas Kayak Tour Package 0

Twilight Paddle